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Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War

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A Case of Espionage on the Eve of the American Revolution

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Spies in the Continental capital : espionage across Pennsylvania during the American Revolution

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  1. Secondary Sources.
  2. Continental Consulting's Web Site - Shills Books - Spies;
  3. Maddie.
  4. La partita della vita (Italian Edition)?

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Staff View: Spies in the Continental Capital :

Please verify that you are not a robot. Would you also like to submit a review for this item? You already recently rated this item. Your rating has been recorded. Despite his eminence as a surgeon - he conducted an autopsy on one of the victims of the Boston Massacre - and his own correspondence and the numbers of references to him from contemporaries, no known image of him exists and many aspects of his life remain obscure. What we do know is that George Washington accused him of being a traitor to the colonial cause and had him arrested and tried; after being jailed in Connecticut, during which he continued to profess his innocence, he was allowed to leave America on a British vessel in , but it foundered in the Atlantic with all hands lost.

The question of whether Dr.

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Benjamin Church was working for the British has never been conclusively demonstrated, and remains among the mysteries of the American Revolution. Nagy has scoured original documents to establish the best case against Church, identifying previously unacknowledged correspondence and reports as containing references to the doctor and his activities, and noting an incriminating letter in the possession of Library of Congress that is a coded communication composed by Church to his British contact.

Nagy shows that at the cusp of the revolution, when the possibility - let alone the outcome - of an American colonial rebellion was far from assured, Church sought to align himself with whom he thought would emerge victorious - the British crown - and thus line his pockets with money that he desperately needed.